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Thread: Many Small Conflicts, Or One Bigger One??

  1. #1

    Question Many Small Conflicts, Or One Bigger One??

    I've set up two routers in my house with the same SSID and password. Works pretty well. As I was setting it up, I stumbled upon SSID. I like it! But now as I can look at my available channels and local conflicts, I have a question.

    One neighbor-my closest one-is using channel 1. A TON of other neighbors are using channel 6. A couple are on Ch11. Since I have two routers, one is on Ch11, and the other is my question. Do you recommend I put it on Ch1 competing with one stronger neighbor or on Ch6 with 7 competing-but lower signal level neighbors?

    While on the topic . . . with a two router setup, does anyone have any recommendations of how I should setup things like NAT redirection and other security settings? I have different IP's, different channels, and DHCP turned off on the 2nd one, but have done little else to tweak them. Any thoughts?

  2. #2

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    I think you just need to experiment to see what gives you the best signal strength and connection/xmit speeds. Personally I don't worry about neighbors even though inSSIDer sees lots of them they're not close enough. I set one router to channel 1 and the other to channel 11 and it will usually automatically use 7 too.

    I don't think there is much you can do on the second router since it is more or less only being used as a switch or WAP.

    In my setup I ended up using different SSID's so I don't support roaming because some of my wireless devices wanted to connect to the router with the weaker signal. When I get time I'll go back and try to play with IP access control and maybe solve that problem.

  3. #3

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    I would put it on the one with the least traffic. This will be hard to know without looking at it with a sniffer or a wispy. As such, I would tend to go with channel 1 (with only one other SSID).

    When you have 2 APs on the same SSID (at home), the client will connected to the first one it finds, then jump to a better one if it "is" better. A low signal does not mean its worse, both could still be giving you good quality. You can even get a strong signal but poor quality due to other traffic or noise.

    A good wifi card will try to stick with the same AP for as long as it can as swapping back and forth can cause packet loss.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for your input on this.

    Any opinion on how to set up other security stuff on the two? Should I have the second router act lie an access point only? With Nat Redirection off?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwalker View Post
    When you have 2 APs on the same SSID (at home), the client will connected to the first one it finds, then jump to a better one if it "is" better. A low signal does not mean its worse, both could still be giving you good quality. You can even get a strong signal but poor quality due to other traffic or noise.

    A good wifi card will try to stick with the same AP for as long as it can as swapping back and forth can cause packet loss.
    I hope I'm not going off topic of this thread.

    Most of the wireless devices I'm using are "dumb" devices (4 cameras, 1 printer) so I assume they don't switch APs unless it completely loses the signal. In one case the router was 3 feet away and the camera still wanted to connect to the router 2 floors below in the basement. The other problem with wifi cameras was that the video would go black if the signal strengh was bad.

    As you said smart wifi adapters like those usually used with laptops seem to handle dual AP w/same SSID setups well.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by teamscottsmith View Post
    Thanks for your input on this.

    Any opinion on how to set up other security stuff on the two? Should I have the second router act lie an access point only? With Nat Redirection off?
    How you setup really depends on what you want. If you want any client to connect to either access point then the setup should be simple.
    - Ensure both the SSIDs are the some (allow to roam to either)
    - Ensure both have the same "security" eg: WPA2
    - Ensure you hav ONLY 1 dhcp server (on that network/vlan)

    If you want to force clients to a set AP, then give them different SSIDs and tell the devices about the AP you want them to connect too.

    pcjunky:
    Most of the time they will only switch if they "think" it will be better. At work at one site we have about 60 APs. I connected to one near my office, then went for a walk, The client did not connect to a better one until the signal was lost. What I did not test was to put it under load. While under no load, it would have been fine.

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