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Thread: Spiking Signals from Neighboring AP's (video included)

  1. #1

    Default Spiking Signals from Neighboring AP's (video included)

    Hello...

    I'm using inSSIDer version 2.1.5.1393 and I've been seeing some of my neighbor's router signals spike 15 to 20dB higher than my own. Is this normal? My PC has a D-Link DWA-552 Adapter and my router is a D-Link DIR-655. I'm not too tech savvy so hopefully my video better explains what I'm experiencing.


  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRIZZMEISTER View Post
    I've been seeing some of my neighbor's router signals spike 15 to 20dB higher than my own. Is this normal?
    I believe you are not seeing a WiFi AP. This is the kind of display you will see from a SSFH or Spread spectrum Frequency hopping device. The modulation technique is to put narrow BW information (<1.5mHz) on many different frequencies in the wifi band, each one only a few ms long. The TX power is much higher and has only a 10% hit on a heavily populated WiFi band. Usually these devices are for audio transmission.

  3. Default SSFH modulation spikes

    Quote Originally Posted by GRIZZMEISTER View Post
    I've been seeing some of my neighbor's router signals spike 15 to 20dB higher than my own. Is this normal?
    I believe you are not seeing a WiFi AP. This is the kind of display you will see from a SSFH or Spread spectrum Frequency hopping device. The modulation technique is to put narrow BW information (<1.5mHz) on many different frequencies in the wifi band, each one only a few ms long. The TX power is much higher and has only a 10% hit on a heavily populated WiFi band. Usually these devices are for audio transmission.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by peterskine View Post
    Usually these devices are for audio transmission.
    Wireless speakers?

  5. #5

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    GRIZZ,

    No, these aren't wireless speakers or anything like that. inSSIDer can only see what your wireless card/adapter can see and that is AP's. Non WiFi devices like wireless speakers cannot be seen by inSSIDer because your wireless card/adapter cannot see them.

    What you are seeing is normal and happens because your wireless card is receiving that data. Why it's receiving data which causes jumps like this could be for many reasons including your card receiving bad data/"misinterpreting data"

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
    Why it's receiving data which causes jumps like this could be for many reasons including your card receiving bad data/"misinterpreting data"
    I loaded inSSIDer on another computer in my house and it's showing the same thing. The second computer is a laptop with a completely different type of wireless card.

  7. #7

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    Hello to all
    I experience the same spike issues and got worried!
    As shown in my screen shot below, various neighbourhood WLAN APs (not all APs) irregularly seem to transmit with high current, even seemingly exceeding the allowed standards based on the flat amplitude tops displayed in inSSIDer (2.1.5.1393).

    See below screenshot
    Click image for larger version. 

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    What I am worried about is that the receivd signals from several WLANs displayed by inSSIDer often exceed the scale. Looks quite unhealthy! Interestingly sometimes those WLAN signals are stable but with flat tops at about -45 dB. From this I conclude that my WLAN adapter is trustworthy, as it makes a difference between -45 dB and exceeding the scale with the same signal.

    Now I want to know if what I see is true (neighbour WLANs obviously operate outside healthy specification!?) or if this must be some kind of software error either in inSSIDer or my hardware drivers. What do you think? By the way: The neighbour living one level above me experiences severe sleeping disorder. For this reason he only uses cable-internet (If he would see what I see on my screen...).

    Hope you have an idea. Thanks for every reply. Greetings @GRIZZMEISTER (Second part of your name is German for "master". How comes?)
    From Germany
    HS-Klaus

    PS:
    I use a Dell Vostro 3350 laptop with Dell Wireless 1702 802.11b/g/n adapter and up to date inSSIDer version: 2.1.5.1393
    In the above screenshot, the WLAN I am logged in to is the stable green, not highlighted line (FRITZ!Box Fon WLAN-7112 (notice the dash before the model number to distinguish from a neighbour Fritz!Box)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #8

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    Hello HS-Klaus! Like your neighbor, my wife and I have been experiencing sleep issues since October of last year. We never had problems like that in our previous 46 years of life. Maybe these RF spikes are affecting our brain waves when we try to sleep, who knows.

    I use the name GRIZZMEISTER because I'm of German descent (my last name is Weissenberg) and people have known me as Grizz for years on various message boards and forums.
    Last edited by GRIZZMEISTER; 10-17-2012 at 06:00 PM.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by hs-klaus View Post
    Hello to all

    What I am worried about is that the receivd signals from several WLANs displayed by inSSIDer often exceed the scale.
    hs-klaus,

    These spikes which "exceed the scale" are from your wireless card receiving data which inSSIDer can't interpret. inSSIDer handles this data by passing it as null which sets it's RSSI to 0dbm causing a spike which goes off the scale.

  10. #10

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    Maybe my video doesn't make it clear but the spikes I'm seeing are not going off the scale or up to 0dBm. The spikes seen by both my desktop and my laptop appear to be about 15 dB higher than my own router's signal which is EXTREMELY bizarre.

    I recently had an expert out to measure RF signals in my home and he also detected some very peculiar RF anomalies. His findings have been passed along to the FCC which is dragging its heals with respect to a proper investigation:

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