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Thread: inSSIDer 2.1 suggests that WINDOWS can now only 'SEE' 802.11a channels 34-48

  1. #1

    Default inSSIDer 2.1 suggests that WINDOWS can now only 'SEE' 802.11a channels 34-48

    Recently Windows XPsp3 and Win7 both stopped 'seeing' channels 100-140.
    I have 4 AP3602's within my space on 40/38 44/48 that are visible and 108/112 (with 10 5g clients) 136/132 (with 1 5g client) that only Chanalyzer sees.
    The XP wnic is a Cisco CB21a and the Win7 wnic is an Intel 3945abg.
    My Fluke AirCheck sees everything..

    Did MS push any patches that I am not aware of?
    Also why does inSSIDer display the channel labels for 100-140 in a gray mode.

  2. #2

    Default

    The NICs you listed are not capable of seeing 802.11n signals.
    As for channels 100-140, their use is FCC restricted to low power dynamic frequency hopping devices that are professionally installed.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ua549 View Post
    The NICs you listed are not capable of seeing 802.11n signals.
    As for channels 100-140, their use is FCC restricted to low power dynamic frequency hopping devices that are professionally installed.
    Close, but no cigar.
    IEEE 802.11h-2003 standards added the 11 UNII-2 channels to the available usage list
    FCC Rule # 15.407(h)(2) requires that products operating in the UNII-2 and UNII-2 extended bands (5.25-5.35 GHz and 5.47-5.725 GHz) must support Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS), to detect and automatically adjusts channels to protect WLAN communications from interfering with military or weather radar systems. All WLAN products that ship in Canada and the US on or after July 20, 2007 must meet the DFS for FCC requirements.
    nuf said.
    As for the nic's not being able to process 11n protocols, that be true. However, the AP is quite happy speaking .11a protocol to any client needing it and will shut off .11n if needed.
    At this point inSSIDer's usefulness is decaying in the enterprise environment.

  4. #4

    Default

    You are missing the point that inSSIDer can only report what your NIC can see.
    If your NIC can't see 802.11n signals, neither can inSSIDer.
    It doesn't matter what the AP's can see.

  5. #5

    Default

    dlritter,

    ua549 is correct. The way in which inSSIDer works is that it pulls the information it needs from your wireless card and displays it to you. So, a limited wireless card = a limited inSSIDer.

    Stephen

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