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Thread: I found an open network in my area... now what

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    Default I found an open network in my area... now what



    I downloaded and started using inSSIDer to locate an open network in my area. I found one, but now I don't know how to add the network to my so it can be used. I'm not doing that wardriving or whatever that's called. Just wanting to create a backup network in case anything ever happens to mine. Can anyone help?

  2. #2

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    I see 18 views on this post and no answers. Does this mean that it can't be done Somebody please reply. Thank you!

  3. #3

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    Pam- Your posted question leaves a couple questions that prevent me from attempting an answer. First, what do you mean about having found an open network? You wrote about wanting to add that network to your (word missing here it appears)? You also wrote of wanting to create a backup network which also leaves me guessing about your intention. inSSIDer displays the wireless networks that are in range of your computer's wifi adapter card. All the signals that your computer's wireless card sees are graphically displayed by inSSIDer along with info about each one (channel, security, etc. for each network signal). That's what the program does. It does not create or control wireless networks.
    My only guess about your meaning of an "open network" would be one with no encryption (security) applied, but that's just a guess.
    If you can be a little clearer, I'm sure there are folks who can answer.

  4. #4

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    Oh, I'm sorry. That word was supposed to be "mine" not "my". The open network I'm speaking of is my neighbor, Dave, down the street. He has it as unsecured so that myself, and other neighbors he has given the name to, can use it if need be. He is currently on vacation and the other day, my electric went out for a couple of hours. What I meant by a "backup" is if that would happen again, and he's still not home, I could still use my laptop. I'm not meaning to hack into anyone's network, if that is what you are thinking. His is unsecured because he lets any neighbors he has told about it use it. Mine is secured with WPA2 because I'm not that trusting of the neighbors, but Dave does have my pw for the very same reason. We live in an area that has power surges every now and again and the electric will go out on one or more houses. What I got when I connected to his network was "Windows was unable to connect to the network". I hope that clears up my question. I'm very new to this inSSIDer thing. I know he's in range because he uses mine frequently (when the surge hits his side of the street... lol) and he says it picks up just fine.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by PamelaArnold View Post
    Oh, I'm sorry. That word was supposed to be "mine" not "my". The open network I'm speaking of is my neighbor, Dave, down the street. He has it as unsecured so that myself, and other neighbors he has given the name to, can use it if need be. He is currently on vacation and the other day, my electric went out for a couple of hours. What I meant by a "backup" is if that would happen again, and he's still not home, I could still use my laptop. I'm not meaning to hack into anyone's network, if that is what you are thinking. His is unsecured because he lets any neighbors he has told about it use it. Mine is secured with WPA2 because I'm not that trusting of the neighbors, but Dave does have my pw for the very same reason. We live in an area that has power surges every now and again and the electric will go out on one or more houses. What I got when I connected to his network was "Windows was unable to connect to the network". I hope that clears up my question. I'm very new to this inSSIDer thing. I know he's in range because he uses mine frequently (when the surge hits his side of the street... lol) and he says it picks up just fine.
    I forgot to mention that the one he allows usage on is a guest account on his network.

  6. #6

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    OK, now I understand. inSSIDer can show you the signal from your neighbor's network, but as mentioned earlier it cannot help you connect to it. You can check to see how strong that network is at your PC and you can verify that it is an unsecured network using inSSIDer. If you're using version 2.1 of inSSIDer, an open network is shown with short dashes forming the channel's signal shape. On the new version3, each signal is labelled in writing as to its security setting.
    Just from what you reported, your PC may not be able to connect to that neighbor's network because it is not, in fact, open. (If it is actually open, no password is needed to connect to it). You can check this possibility via inSSIDer. You can also see how strong that neigbor's signal is at your PC.

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    Also, keep in mind that using an unsecured network is very risky. An attacker could sit out on the street with a laptop, or in a house nearby, watching the web traffic you generate. That means passwords, credit card numbers, bank accounts, everything. I never, ever use the internet on an unsecured network, especially not in a neighborhood or at a coffee shop.

    I would recommend that Dave encrypt his network with WPA2, and share encryption keys with trust neighbors.

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