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Thread: inSSIDer shows connected to a 2.4ghz channel yet computer shows I'm connected to 5ghz

  1. #1

    Default inSSIDer shows connected to a 2.4ghz channel yet computer shows I'm connected to 5ghz

    So, I'm new and my wifi has been continually dropping. I came across inSIDDer, which hasn't really highlighted any problems. (Router Asus RT-ac66u)

    When I click on the signal strength indicator in my system tray, it shows available networks. When I hover my pointer over my connected network it shows "Radio Type: 802.11n" Then, after I open inSIDDer, it shows channel 6 (which I'm fairly certain is a 2.4ghz channel) but 802.11 type "n"

    Thoughts?


    Thnx!!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    802.11n is a standard that applies to both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands.
    In the USA 2.4 GHz = channels 1 through 11 and 5 GHz = channel 36 and higher.

    What makes you think your computer is using the 5 GHz band?
    Old Mod by the Sea

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ua549 View Post
    802.11n is a standard that applies to both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands.
    In the USA 2.4 GHz = channels 1 through 11 and 5 GHz = channel 36 and higher.

    What makes you think your computer is using the 5 GHz band?
    I explained why in my first post... Is there another way to check? Plus, it shows connection speed at 144 mbps.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by grimloktt
    When I click on the signal strength indicator in my system tray, it shows available networks. When I hover my pointer over my connected network it shows "Radio Type: 802.11n"
    802.11n does NOT imply or indicate 5 GHz band use. There are many 802.11n wi-fi network adapters that only use the 2.4 GHz band.

    The speed does not indicate 5 GHz band use either. A single 802.11n stream can have a data rate of up to 150 Mbps. A maximum of 4 streams are allowed by the standard. Not all hardware, software or environments are capable of supporting these maximums.
    Old Mod by the Sea

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ua549 View Post
    802.11n does NOT imply or indicate 5 GHz band use. There are many 802.11n wi-fi network adapters that only use the 2.4 GHz band.

    The speed does not indicate 5 GHz band use either. A single 802.11n stream can have a data rate of up to 150 Mbps. A maximum of 4 streams are allowed by the standard. Not all hardware, software or environments are capable of supporting these maximums.
    How do I figure out if I'm using n? I want fastest speeds available. Thnx!!!

  6. #6
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    Because the connection speed you reported is 144 Mbps the adapter is using 802.11n. Your router is an 802.11ac model that is theoretically capable of up to 1.3 Gbps. Network speed will be limited by the wi-fi adapter your system. In Windows open Device Manager, Network adapters to determine the model and configuration of the adapter.

    That said, your surfing speed will be limited by your internet connection.
    Old Mod by the Sea

  7. #7

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    802.11n is both a 2.4 or a 5 GHz standard. It operates in either band. In fact, many "802.11n" cards are single-band, and operate in 2.4 GHz only.

    If a card says 802.11b/g/n, then it's a single-band, 2.4 GHz-only card. If it says 802.11a/b/g/n, then it is a dual-band, 2.4 and 5 GHz card. The giveaway is where is says 802.11a, A is a 5 GHz-only standard.

    So if your computer says that it's using 802.11n, it could be 2.4 or 5 GHz. I'm going with inSSIDer on this one... if it says you are connected to a 2.4 GHz channel, it's using 2.4 GHz N.

    I hope that helps!
    Joel, Mobility+, ECSE, CWNE #233
    Technical Trainer
    MetaGeek

  8. #8

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    I'm using Wireless-N 2200 (http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/...ss-n-2200.html). It looks like it is single band. It doesn't say "a." It does say dual stream. Thoughts?

    Up until now, I always thought N = 5 ghz. So, that's not correct, ha?

  9. #9

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    "Dual Stream" would mean that its capable of 2 spatial streams. This is part of the 802.11n suite that allows higher data rates. As these guys have said before me, 802.11n is basically some MIMO (multiple in, multiple out) technology that can be applied to either 2.4GHz or 5GHz. WiFi routers and clients must support 802.11a if you wish to use 5GHz. 802.11n is not a sign that 5GHz is supported.

  10. #10

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    Yup, looks like it's a single-band 802.11n device that supports two spatial streams. "Two Spatial Streams" is a much more accurate than "dual stream". Ugh, hate marketing departments sometimes...
    Joel, Mobility+, ECSE, CWNE #233
    Technical Trainer
    MetaGeek

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