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Thread: Why two 2.4GHz channels, one dotted?

  1. #1

    Default Why two 2.4GHz channels, one dotted?

    I see from unsuccessfully trying to find an answer to my question, that a dotted line means unencrypted.

    But what is the second, unencrypted 2.4GHz channel all about?

    Thanks

    Martin
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  2. #2

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    Which AP in your screen shot is in question? The first three AP's appear to be from the same physical box because the mac addresses are quite similar. Some physical AP boxes can have several distinct but similar mac address and thus separate wifi networks. I have one box that can provision six distinct wifi networks.

    Every network displayed is encrypted with WPA-personal or WPA2-personal.
    Old Mod by the Sea

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ua549 View Post
    Which AP in your screen shot is in question? The first three AP's appear to be from the same physical box because the mac addresses are quite similar. Some physical AP boxes can have several distinct but similar mac address and thus separate wifi networks. I have one box that can provision six distinct wifi networks.

    Every network displayed is encrypted with WPA-personal or WPA2-personal.
    Thanks for replying. Sorry, I should have been more specific. The device is an Asus router broadcasting on 2.4 and 5 GHz. The MAC addresses are identical. ( I'm sure it's over the top, but I scrubbed out part of the address.). It's the 2 almost coincident 2.4GHz lines - the solid blue one and the dotted brown one almost hidden by the blue one, except when the signal drops and returns.
    And this is reflected on the left-hand side by the top 2 lines, both 2.4 GHz, each of which gets highlighted alternatively every couple of seconds. Why 2 apparent 2.4 channels?

    And I suppose I could then ask, how come the 5GHz band doesn't exhibit similar properties.

    Martin

  4. #4

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    It appears that one of the AP's is a guest network and the other is not.
    A guest network is one that allows internet access and blocks access to the local network.
    A guest network is often configured and enabled by default.
    You need to use the router/AP management tools to verify the configuration.
    Old Mod by the Sea

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ua549 View Post
    It appears that one of the AP's is a guest network and the other is not.
    A guest network is one that allows internet access and blocks access to the local network.
    A guest network is often configured and enabled by default.
    You need to use the router/AP management tools to verify the configuration.
    Many thanks. I've no idea why but I'd assumed what I was seeing was normal behaviour from a router. No wonder I couldn't find an answer on Google. In fact, before I posted my question, I double checked that my guest network was as I had set it: disabled, and it was. And only one 2.4 band was ever picked up by my laptop and iPhone. Today I set up the Huawei router my ISP sent me to see if that demonstrated similar behaviour. It doesn't; the 2.4 and 5 GHz bands display as you'd expect. So I went back and looked at my Asus, and Sod's Law has kicked in: there's now just one 2.4GHz band.

    So I don't know what was going on. but it was by no means the first time I'd seen it. I realise now that I should have asked my question on the Asus-Merlin firmware forum. So I will send that screenshot to the forum and see if anyone has an idea what it represents. If I get an answer I'll post back.

    Meanwhile, many thanks for taking the trouble to look into it for me.

    Martin

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